An Auto-anthropological view of video gamers 

My Master's in Photography taken at AUB in 2018-19 reflected my challenge with my son's gaming habit, something like 10 to 15 hours a day.  This was his way of communicating with his friends but with little interaction with the rest of the family.   I started from a very negative point of view but came to understand the need and compulsion to game.  It was social, he met new friends this way but the gaming companies promoted addiction by their encouragement to buy more kit, say in Fortnite, by their use of music and the acceleration of pace.  Celebrity culture and money made this genre acceptable to a worldwide audience.  For a ten year period (age 9-19) this compulsion to game became an essential part of his life.  It made him leave a school, become aggressive and withdrawn.   Now I am happy to say, things have changed, he is far more balanced.  Yes he games but now he can pick it up when bored and he can now take note of the other worlds around him.  

This project showed me an addiction not many had seen before.  It brought me into contact with the Breck Foundation and Psychotherapists.   I used my knowledge of Old Master Paintings, learnt when I worked at Christies' and Art UK to reflect my concerns.